Pushing Spanish Olives Down Our 1958 Throats


Hello Dear Readers! Today as a special treat, we will be revisiting the Imported Spanish Olive Industry of 1958 through the pages of this glorious pamphlet:

The Magic of Olives with 35 delicious new recipes from 1958!

The Magic of Olives with 35 delicious new recipes from 1958!

How the Imported Spanish Olive Industry all Began

Legend has it that back in 1958, a brave Madison Avenue Advertising Executive hitched a ride on a steamboat to a land called Spain where he promptly fell into a siesta (which loosely translated means asleep) under a Spanish Green Olive Tree.

When he awoke, he was famished and picked a Spanish Green Olive off a branch of the tree, thinking it a very strange little Spanish apple of some sort and popped it into his mouth after which he exclaimed “Ay Carumba!  And viola! just like that the Imported Spanish Green Olive Industry of 1958 was born!

The next thing you know, Imported Spanish Olives of 1958 were spicing up practically every dish in America, Canada, and most of Nova Scotia in concoctions like Hacienda Chicken.

Hacienda Chicken which loosely translated means Hacienda Chicken

This dish is called Hacienda Chicken which loosely translated means Hacienda Chicken

In this dish, we are experiencing the joy of Imported Spanish Olives as they siesta (see above for translation) atop an unmade bed of rice — lending much-needed pizazz to the orange objects which deductive reasoning tells us must be the Hacienda Chicken!

Next up we have Olive Salmon Noodle Ring:

This dish is called Olive Salmon Noodle Ring which loosely translated means Hacienda Chicken

This dish is called Olive Salmon Noodle Ring which loosely translated means Hacienda Chicken

In this dish, North Americans of 1958 could experience the magic of  the noodle-salmon- olive teaming the likes of which hadn’t been experienced since the Spanish Conquistadors threw After Conquer Parties in the corridors of the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria!

And notice how the Imported Spanish Olives lend an air of importance to the  salmon.   Surrounding it as if to say, “I’m circling you Mr. Senor or Mr. Senorita!

And finally there’s this shameless blatant shout out to the Spanish Olive:

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What this sandwich lacks in imagination it makes up for in Imported Spanish Olives!  The idea being that even the simplest of North American dishes of 1958 could be made just that much better through the stacking, piling and/or slathering on of Imported Spanish Olives!

And if this doesn’t make the average household of North American want to run to (or possibly from) the dinner table, the Imported Spanish Olive Industry of 1958 doesn’t know what will!

Until next time . . . I love you

26 thoughts on “Pushing Spanish Olives Down Our 1958 Throats

    • I despised the green ones as a child or at least I thought I did. I never actually had the nerve to try one and still haven’t! Which is one of the very few things I haven’t tried. Most foods I hated as a child I absolutely adore now! :D So glad you liked this one Katykins!!

      • I think you should try them again. I used to think they tasted vile. My friend has a theory that you don’t appreciate how olives taste until you hit 25. I say brave it! :)

        • You know what Katy? You’ve talked me into it! The next green olive I see is going to take a little visit to my stomach! Haha! Or at the very least I’ll put the eating of green olives on my bucket list! HA! :D

  1. Are these dishes TRYING to make us ill? Unappetizing is a great word to describe these conquistador concoctions! But I love your writing about them!

  2. Thank you, this is wonderful, who knew it was so easy to give your food a perky new look! (Must go buy olives)
    Loved the post!

  3. That book is cheating! it can’t be a recipe if you are only putting olives on top of every dish. Then again they are onto something, I can now adapt Ina Garten’s recipe book by adding a dollop of marmalade on top of every recipe and call it The Marmalade Cookbook. Then I’ll oust her from her cosy East Hampton life.

  4. I am also a black olive sorta gal. I was surprised there is no Spanish Olives in Jello or aspic recipe.(Picture it, yum yum)

    • How funny that you should say that Maryisidra because there is a picture, a horrible disgusting picture of Spanish Olives in a Jello in the Pamphlet! They were always doing stuff like that in the 50′s!! EW! :D

  5. Next week you should write about the black olive delicacies that consist of wearing an olive on each finger. A Thanksgiving tradition in our family!

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